THE LOUVRE – PARIS

 

Louvre Arch Spiderman Simon Fieldhouse THE LOUVRE   PARIS

Spiderman at The Louvre – Paris

Spider-Man is a fictional character, a comic book superhero that appears in comic books published by Marvel Comics. Created by writer-editor Stan Lee and writer-artist Steve Ditko, he first appeared in Amazing Fantasy #15 (cover-dated Aug. 1962). Lee and Ditko conceived the character as an orphan being raised by his Aunt May and Uncle Ben, and as a teenager, having to deal with the normal struggles of adolescence in addition to those of a costumed crimefighter. Spider-Man’s creators gave him super strength and agility, the ability to cling to most surfaces, shoot spider-webs using wrist-mounted devices of his own invention (which he called “web-shooters”), and react to danger quickly with his “spider-sense”, enabling him to combat his foes.

When Spider-Man first appeared in the early 1960s, teenagers in superhero comic books were usually relegated to the role of sidekick to the protagonist. The Spider-Man series broke ground by featuring Peter Parker, a teenage high school student and person behind Spider-Man’s secret identity to whose “self-obsessions with rejection, inadequacy, and loneliness” young readers could relate.[3] Unlike previous teen heroes such asBucky and Robin, Spider-Man did not benefit from being the protégé of any adult superhero mentors like Captain America and Batman, and thus had to learn for himself that “with great power there must also come great responsibility”—a line included in a text box in the final panel of the first Spider-Man story, but later retroactively attributed to his guardian, the late Uncle Ben.

Marvel has featured Spider-Man in several comic book series, the first and longest-lasting of which is titled The Amazing Spider-Man. Over the years, the Peter Parker character has developed from shy, nerdy high school student to troubled but outgoing college student, to married high school teacher to, in the late 2000s, a single freelance photographer, his most typical adult role. In the 2010s, he joins the Avengers and theFantastic Four, Marvel’s flagship superhero teams. In a 2012 – 2014 storyline, Peter Parker dies while his mind is in the body of his enemy Doctor Octopus; Doctor Octopus then lives on inside of Parker’s body, taking the role of Spider-Man in The Superior Spider-Man. However, Parker returned to his body in April 2014.[4] Separately, Marvel has also published books featuring alternate versions of Spider-Man, including Spider-Man 2099, which features the adventures of Miguel O’Hara, the Spider-Man of the future; Ultimate Spider-Man, which features the adventures of a teenaged Peter Parker in an alternate universe; and Ultimate Comics Spider-Man, which depicts the teenager Miles Morales, who takes up the mantle of Spider-Man after Ultimate Peter Parker’s death.

Spider-Man is one of the most popular and commercially successful superheroes.[5] As Marvel’s flagship character and company mascot, he has appeared in many forms of media, including several animated and live-action television showssyndicated newspaper comic strips, and a series of films starring Tobey Maguire as the hero in the first three movies. Andrew Garfield took over the role of Spider-Man in a reboot of the films.[6]Reeve Carney starred as Spider-Man in the 2010 Broadway musical Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark.[7] Spider-Man placed 3rd on IGN’s Top 100 Comic Book Heroes of All Time in 2011, behind DC Comics charactersSuperman and Batman

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SYDNEY HARBOUR BRIDGE

Sydney Harbour Bridge Simon Fieldhouse SYDNEY HARBOUR BRIDGE

Sydney Harbour Bridge

The Sydney Harbour Bridge is a steel through arch bridge across Sydney Harbour that carries rail, vehicular, bicycle and pedestrian traffic between the Sydney central business district (CBD) and the North Shore. The dramatic view of the bridge, the harbour, and the nearby Sydney Opera House is an iconic image of Sydney, and Australia. The bridge is nicknamed “The Coathanger” because of its arch-based design.[1][2] Furthermore, the bridge is ubiquitously known to Sydneysiders and Australians more widely, simply as “the Bridge”.

Under the directions of Queenslander Dr J.J.C. Bradfield of the NSW Department of Public Works, the bridge was designed and built by British firm Dorman Long and Co Ltd of Middlesbrough and opened in 1932.[3][4] The bridge’s design was influenced by the Hell Gate Bridge in New York.[5] It is also the sixth longest spanning-arch bridge in the world, and it is the tallest steel arch bridge, measuring 134 m (440 ft) from top to water level.[6] It was also the world’s widest long-span bridge, at 48.8 m (160 ft) wide, until construction of the new Port Mann Bridge in Vancouver.[7][8]

The southern (CBD) end of the bridge is located at Millers Point in The Rocks area, and the northern end at Milsons Point in the lower North Shore area. There are six original lanes of road traffic through the main roadway, plus an additional two lanes of road traffic on its eastern side, using lanes that were formally tram tracks). Adjacent to the road traffic, a path for pedestrian use runs along the eastern side of the bridge, whilst a dedicated path for bicycle use only runs along the western side. Finally, between the main roadway and the western bicycle path are two lanes used for railway tracks, servicing the T1 North Shore Line for Sydney Trains.

 

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UNIVERSITY OF SYDNEY

University of Sydney Aerial Simon Fieldhouse 1 UNIVERSITY OF SYDNEY

University of Sydney – Aerial

The University of Sydney is an Australian public university in Sydney. Founded in 1850, it is Australia’s first university and is regarded as one of its most prestigious, ranked as the world’s 27th most reputable university.[2] In 2013, it was ranked 38th and in the top 0.3% in the QS World University Rankings. Five Nobel or Crafoord laureates have been affiliated with the university as graduates and faculty.[3] Its campus is ranked in the top 10 of the world’s most beautiful universities by the British Daily Telegraph, The Huffington Post and Disney Pixar and is spread across the inner-city suburbs of Camperdown and Darlington.

The University comprises 16 faculties and schools, through which it offers bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degrees. In 2011 it had 32,393 undergraduate and 16,627 graduate students.

Sydney is a member of Australia’s Group of Eight, Academic Consortium 21, the Association of Pacific Rim Universities (APRU), the Association of Commonwealth Universities and the Worldwide Universities Network. The University is also colloquially known as one of Australia’s sandstone universities.

In 1848, in the New South Wales Legislative Council, William Wentworth, a graduate of the University of Cambridge and Charles Nicholson, a medical graduate from the University of Edinburgh Medical School, proposed a plan to expand the existing Sydney College into a larger university. Wentworth argued that a state university was imperative for the growth of a society aspiring towards self-government, and that it would provide the opportunity for “the child of every class, to become great and useful in the destinies of his country”.[7] It would take two attempts on Wentworth’s behalf, however, before the plan was finally adopted.

The university was established via the passage of the University of Sydney Act,[8] on 24 September 1850 and was assented on 1 October 1850 by Sir Charles Fitzroy.[9] Two years later, the university was inaugurated on 11 October 1852 in the Big Schoolroom of what is now Sydney Grammar School. The first principal was John Woolley,[10] the first professor of chemistry and experimental physics was John Smith.[11] On 27 February 1858 the university received its Royal Charter from Queen Victoria, giving degrees conferred by the university rank and recognition equal to those given by universities in the United Kingdom.[12] By 1859, the university had moved to its current site in the Sydney suburb of Camperdown.

In 1858, the passage of the Electoral Act provided for the university to become a constituency for the New South Wales Legislative Assembly as soon as there were 100 graduates of the university holding higher degrees eligible for candidacy. This seat in the Parliament of New South Wales was first filled in 1876, but was abolished in 1880 one year after its second member, Edmund Barton, who later became the first Prime Minister of Australia, was elected to the Legislative Assembly.

Most of the estate of John Henry Challis was bequeathed to the university, which received a sum of £200,000 in 1889. This was thanks in part due to William Montagu Manning (Chancellor 1878–95) who argued against the claims by British Tax Commissioners. The following year seven professorships were created: anatomy; zoology; engineering; history; law; logic and mental philosophy; and modern literature.

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Soho – Manhattan

Soho Stairs New York Simon Fieldhouse Soho   Manhattan

Soho – Manhattan

SoHo, sometimes spelled Soho,[2] is a neighborhood in Lower Manhattan, New York City, which in recent history came to the public’s attention for being the location of many artists’ lofts and art galleries, but is now more noted for its variety of shops ranging from trendy upscale boutiques to national and international chain store outlets. The area’s history is an archetypal example of inner-city regeneration and gentrification, encompassing socio-economic, cultural, political and architectural developments.[3]

Almost all of SoHo is included in the SoHo-Cast Iron Historic District, which was designated by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1973, extended in 2010, and was listed on the National Register of Historic Places and declared a National Historic Landmark in 1978.[4] It consists of 26 blocks and approximately 500 buildings,[5] many of them incorporating cast iron architectural elements. Many side streets in the district are paved with Belgian blocks.[6]

The name “SoHo” refers to the area being “SOuth of HOuston (Street)”, and was also a reference to the London district of Soho.[7] It was coined by Chester Rapkin,[8] an urban planner and author of the The South Houston Industrial Area study,[9] also known as the “Rapkin Report”. This began a naming convention that became a model for the names of emerging and re-purposed neighborhoods in New York such as TriBeCa for “TRIangle BElow CAnal Street”, DUMBO (“Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass”), NoHo (“NOrth of HOuston Street”), Nolita (“NOrth of Little ITAly”) and NoMad (“NOrth of MADison Square”), among others.

SoHo boasts the greatest collection of cast-iron architecture in the world.[24] Approximately 250 cast iron buildings stand in New York City and the majority of them are in SoHo. Cast iron was initially used as a decorative front over a pre-existing building. With the addition of modern, decorative facades, older industrial buildings were able to attract new commercial clients. Most of these facades were constructed during the period from 1840 to 1880.[10] In addition to revitalizing older structures, buildings in SoHo were later designed to feature the cast iron.

The E. V. Haughwout Building at Broadway and Broome Street was built in 1856–57, and has a cast-iron facade by Daniel D. Badger

An American architectural innovation, cast iron was cheaper to use for facades than materials such as stone or brick. Molds of ornamentation, prefabricated in foundries, were used interchangeably for many buildings, and a broken piece could be easily recast. The buildings could be erected quickly; some were built in four months. Despite the brief construction period, the quality of the cast iron designs was not sacrificed. Bronze had previously been the metal most frequently used for architectural detail. Architects found that the relatively inexpensive cast iron could provide intricately designed patterns. Classical French and Italian architectural designs were often used as models for these facades. Because stone was the material associated with architectural masterpieces, cast iron, painted in neutral tints such as beige, was used to simulate stone.

There was a profusion of cast iron foundries in New York, including Badger’s Architectural Iron Works, James L. Jackson’s Iron Works, and Cornell Iron Works.

Since the iron was pliable and easily molded, sumptuously curved window frames were created, and the strength of the metal allowed these frames considerable height. The once-somber, gas-lit interiors of the industrial district were flooded with sunlight through the enlarged windows. The strength of cast iron permitted high ceilings with sleek supporting columns, and interiors became expansive and functional.

During cast iron’s heyday, many architects thought it to be structurally more sound than steel. It was also thought that cast iron would be fire-resistant, and facades were constructed over many interiors built of wood and other flammable materials. When exposed to heat, cast iron buckled, and later cracked under the cold water used to extinguish fire. In 1899, a building code mandating the backing of cast iron fronts with masonry was passed. Most of the buildings that stand today are constructed in this way. It was the advent of steel as a major construction material that brought an end to the cast iron era.

 

 

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Sydney Aerial View Looking North

Sydney Aerial Simon Fieldhouse Sydney Aerial View Looking North

Sydney Aerial looking North

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